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The word ‘budget’ often implies compromise, doesn’t it? While that can hold true, the Beaumont Rev 2 proves that ride quality doesn’t have to be sacrificed. Even without high-tech suspension or top-tier components, this bike delivers a genuinely comfortable experience.

Its Dutch-inspired design offers an upright, relaxed riding position for excellent visibility. While the Beaumont Rev 2 lacks suspension (common for its class and price), the wide, leather seat provides surprising cushioning and absorbs bumps better than you might expect.

The Compass 27.5 x 2.4″ tires feature a semi-slick tread we found to be quiet when rolling and the traction felt reliable. Retrospec suggests this bike is ideal for riders from 5′ to 5’10” – likely due to the non-adjustable stem. Interestingly, at 5 ’11”, I still found the Beaumont comfortable throughout my testing.

Also, the low step-over frame height of just 19.35 inches makes mounting and dismounting much easier – a welcome touch for any rider..

The Beaumont Rev 2 boasts practical features for daily commuting, including front and rear metal fenders, a rear rack rated for 22 lbs, and AA battery-powered front and rear lights.

Staying true to its budget-conscious nature, the bike forgoes an LCD display. Instead, it has a simple indicator panel on the left handlebar showing battery and pedal assist levels, with corresponding adjustment buttons. Unfortunately, the thumb throttle’s placement is a bit awkward. I found myself instinctively reaching for the throttle when intending to change assist levels, requiring a conscious effort to ensure I hit the correct button. A revised control layout would improve this aspect of the user experience.

The right handlebar features a Shimano Tourney shifter for the 7-speed drivetrain, with a 42T front chainring and a 14-34T cassette. This setup provides a practical gear range for pedaling in most cases, even when you choose not to use the motor. I would like to see a slightly wider range in the rear cog as after about 15-16 mph the bike feels undergeared.

The Beaumont Rev 2 also has a few practical features for daily commuting, including front and rear metal fenders, a rear rack rated for 22 lbs, and AA battery-powered front and rear lights.

Staying true to its budget-conscious nature, the bike forgoes an LCD display. Instead, it has a simple indicator panel on the left handlebar showing battery and pedal assist levels, with corresponding adjustment buttons. Unfortunately, the thumb throttle’s placement is a bit awkward. I found myself instinctively reaching for the throttle when intending to change assist levels, requiring a conscious effort to ensure I hit the correct button. A revised control layout would improve this aspect of the user experience.

The right handlebar features a Shimano Tourney shifter for the 7-speed drivetrain, with a 42T front chainring and a 14-34T cassette. This setup provides a practical gear range for pedaling, even when you choose not to use the motor.

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#Retrospect #Beaumont #Rev #Review

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